School Nurse

Preventing the Flu: Good Health Habits Can Help Stop Germs

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Fact Sheet

  • Avoid close contact.
    • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
    • When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
    • Stay home from work, school, and errands when you are sick.
    • Keep sick children at home.
    • You will prevent others from catching the illness.
  • Cover your mouth and nose.
    • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing.
    • Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands often.
    • Washing your hands and the hands of your children often will help protect you from germs.
    • Wash under the nails, as well as both sides of your hand with soap under warm water for at least one minute.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth.
    • Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.
    • Use sanitizer whenever possible, but do not touch eyes, nose, or mouth as some contain chemicals that could cause discomfort.
  • Practice other good health habits.
    • Get plenty of sleep.
    • Be physically active.
    • Manage your stress.
    • Drink plenty of fluids.
    • Eat nutritious food.
 

There is no vaccine available at this time for the current outbreak of the Swine Flu virus (H1N1), so it is important for people living in the affected areas to take steps to prevent spreading the virus to others. If people are ill, they should stay at home and limit contact with others, except to seek medical care. Healthy residents living in these areas should take the everyday preventive actions listed above.

People who live in these areas who develop an illness with fever and respiratory symptoms, such as cough and runny nose, and possibly other symptoms, such as body aches, nausea, or vomiting or diarrhea, should contact their health care provider. Their health care provider will determine whether influenza testing is needed. 


Tennessee Immunization Requirements for Child Care & School

Tennessee Department of Health Rule Chapter 1200-14-1-29

For the first time in 10 years, the Tennessee Department of Health (TDOH) has changed and updated its immunization requirements for child care, pre-school, and school entry. The effective date of most changes is July 2010. Detailed official guidance, including the immunization schedule and the new Immunization Certificate, will be made available no later than April 1 online at http://health.state.tn.us/twis/ or at the TDOH website: http://health.state.tn.us/CEDS/required.htm

Children in Child Care Facilities (new requirements underlined):

  • Diptheria-Tetanus-Pertussis (DTap, or DT if appropriate)
  • Hepatitis B (HBV)
  • Poliomyelitis (IPV or OPV)
  • Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib): age younger than 5 years only (this requirement is reseumed following suspension during a national Hib vaccine shortage 2008-2009)
  • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV): age younger than 5 years only
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (1 dose of each, usually given together as MMR)
  • Varicella (1 dose or history of disease
  • Hepatitis A (1 dose by 18 months of age)

Children entering Kindergarten (new requirements underlined):

  • Diptheria-Tetanus-Pertussis (DTap, or DT if appropriate)
  • Hepatitis B (HBV)
  • Poliomyelitis (IPV or OPV): final dose on or after the 4th birthday now required
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (2 doses of each, usually given together as MMR)
  • Varicella (2 doses or history of disease): previously only one dose was required
  • Hepatitis A (2 doses): effective July 1, 2011

Children entering 7th grade (new requirements underlined):

  • Tetanus-diptheria-pertussis booster ("Tdap")
  • Verification of immunity to varicella (2 doses or history of disease)

Children who are new enrollees in a TN school in grades other than K or 7th:

  • Diptheria-Tetanus-Pertussis (DTaP, or DT if appropriate)
  • Hepatitis B (HBV): previously only for Kindergarten, 7th grade entry
  • Poliomyelitis (IPV or OPV): final dose on or after the 4th birthday now required
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (2 doses of each, usually given together as MMR)
  • Varicella (2 doses or history of disease): previously only one dose was required

Children with medical or religious exemption to requirements:

  • Medical: Healthcare provider must indicate which specific vaccines are medically exempted (because of risk or harm) on the new form. Other vaccines remain required.
  • Religious: Requires only a signed statement by the parent/guardian that vaccination conflicts with their religious tenets or practices. If documentation of a health examination is required, it must be noted by the health care provider on the immunization certificate. In that case, the provider may explain the absence of the immunization information by checking that the parent has obtained a religious exemption.
 

Last updated February 2, 2010

 


What is the difference between cleaning and disinfecting?...read this to find out.

 


Directions for Washing Hands

HOWnursehand300

  • Wet hands with running water
  • Place soap into palms
  • Rub together to make a lather
  • Scrub hands vigorously for 20 seconds
  • Rinse soap off handsClock
  • Dry hands with disposable paper towels, not on clothing

NurseHandsToiletWHEN

  • After going to the toilet
  • Upon exiting animal areas
  • Before eating
  • Before preparing foods
  • After removing soiled clothes or shoes
  • Any time you have touched public items